Lada 🏡 Prkic

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Does Every Comment Merit a Reply?

Does Every Comment Merit a Reply?Thank You!
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I like being on beBee more than any other social network. That is the reason why I am sometimes a bit too critical towards some things I noticed here that could, in my opinion, diminish the pleasure of social networking. 

After my post about clogging hives with irrelevant content, I decided to write about another topic.

As a reader primarily but also as someone who gives a try at writing occasionally, I ask myself should writers reply to every comment on their articles.

Dr Ali Ananni in his post The Spontaneous Writer said: "Expect no feedback. Write because you are in the flow and don’t block the flow with feelings of fear of criticism, or lack of feedback."

I thought the same about blogging when started writing on beBee.  But now I write expecting feedback in the form of comments and am grateful to those who share their insights on my posts. I am sure that most bloggers on beBee expect and appreciate comments too.

If so, why they do not reply to every comment on their posts.

Does every comment merit a reply?

According to some statistics, far less than 1% of people who read online leave comments. If people take time to comment on my posts, they deserve at least a few minutes of my time and responses. I apologise if I failed to reply to your comments sometimes. :) For me, responding is as time-consuming as writing a post. It can be repetitive but also stimulating when comments are insightful and relevant to the topic. Sometimes it's hard to find a reason to respond to generic comments given the same way by the same persons. But I appreciate those comments too because of their good intentions. To me, it is not only about acknowledging comments (commenters), it is also about encouraging conversation. After all, it is my purpose of being on beBee.

Being on the other side of a stick, as a reader, I notice that some writers selectively reply to comments, usually to the same group of friends and followers. It is discouraging, and readers are less likely to comment again if they repeatedly don't receive responses.

In the beginning when I just joined beBee I had similar experiences. At first, I thought my comments were not worth a reply, but after a while, I noticed the pattern in responding mentioned above.

Another group of writers are those who don't bother to reply at all. They just leave their posts and disappear while at the same time being active on other social networks. Sadly, some of these writers are from my field that is already poorly represented with only a few active members and a lack of posting.

Fortunately, most writers engage with readers and reply to almost every comment no matter how long the comment thread. Two of them deserve admiration while coping with dozens and even hundreds of responses. Those heroes of social media engagement are Ali Annani and Phil Friedman. No other words are needed just take a tour through their blogs.

On beBee, there are many more writers whose blog posts attract commenters regardless of topics because their comments are dignified with a reply, not ignored. 

I don't expect all writers to agree with this point of view. Everyone has their own perception of engagement on social media as well as the reasons for writing.

However, one question bothers me. When intentions behind comment are not good, should such comment be dignified with a reply? I am still in doubt and mostly guided by intuition.


What is your opinion? 

Do you care when an author doesn't reply to your comment? 

Do you feel obligated to reply to every comment?

 

                                                                       I would very much appreciate your comments.

 

 


 

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Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

2 years ago #72

#90
Ken, there is no need to apologise. I understand that your work is of the utmost importance. 😉🎅 Thank you for commenting now. I am glad that Jim also commented because he gave a different view on this topic. Perhaps I have a wrong perception of the social media community.

Jim Murray

Jim Murray

2 years ago #71

I probably don't respond to comments as much as I should. But I do read them all. Most of them, lucky for me, are kind of agreeing with whatever I was writing about, and so there's kind of no need to respond other than to acknowledge. I personally don't care about getting a response to my comments unless I am asking a question. But overall, I like posting here because, except for the odd crazy Brian MacKenzie rant comment (LOL) , people here are pretty quite civilized, which I consider rare and wonderful on social media, which has, for the most part become kind of a cesspool.

Ken Boddie

Ken Boddie

2 years ago #70

I fully agree, Lada, that comments on our posts, particularly more so when they are constructively and thoughtfully appended by others, deserve our time and effort to submit an appropriate response. Furthermore, I firmly believe that, after we hit the publish button, we are duty bound to monitor our posts for subsequent comments (hence enforcing the uniqueness and social bonding of this platform). I have always been somewhat 'miffed' when some of my comments (many of which take some time and effort to formulate) are ignored on the posts of other authors. It follows that I make every effort to avoid creating similar offence or annoyance to commenters on my posts, by directly responding when they are genuine (ie not from trolls or doubtful 'bots') and aimed directly at me and my post. Sorry that I appear to have missed this post first time around. I can only plead guilty and throw myself on your mercy, with the possible saving grace that I may have been fully occupied at that time of year (December 2017) in assisting with the near impossible task of worldwide present delivery via ultrasonic sleigh and big red boomers. 🎅

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

2 years ago #69

The latest article by Ken Boddie prompted me to stir my honey barrel and share this old one. https://www.bebee.com/producer/@ken-boddie/is-commending-the-commenter-a-matter-of-a-pinion

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #68

#86
You're right, Ali. Life makes us both teacher and student. Thank you.

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

it is the exchange of roles that make us both teachers and students. If a teacher doesn't become a student then his/her knowledge shall stop growing disqualifying him or her as a teacher. I am happy to be your student Lada \ud83c\udfe1 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #66

#84
That's very nice of you to say, Ali. You are always a gentleman. But we all know who is the teacher and who is a student. :-)

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#78
Your engagement and responses Lada \ud83c\udfe1 Prkic to comments here is the proof that you mastered the art of dialogue. We may learn a lot from you as well.

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #64

#79
Let's just ignore the intention behind the question (if there is). My husband is waiting for me to go out for a Sunday walk but I wanted first to write a few words as a reply to your comment. :-) In my comment, I was just wondering about the fact that many times after replying to someone's comment I didn't receive any further feedback. I didn't even know whether a person read my response. That's what I meant when I asked myself about the importance of continuing dialogue and how to achieve it. Sometimes a lack of continuing feedback is due to a glitch in the notification system (as I experienced more than once) but sometimes it's because a person has written their comments in passing, as one of many. But most times it depends on an author of a post and his ability (and credibility) to attract readers and encourage further conversation with them.

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

3 years ago #63

#78
Lada \ud83c\udfe1 Prkic, for what it’s worth, my experience is that engagement comes in many forms. Most is in goodwill, whether just a few kind wirds of praise or in the form of an extended detailed critique. I welcome it all, even criticism — as long as the criticism is on topic. This includes genuine wuestions, too. But I have also found that some question are framed with a clear undertone if criticism. For example, “Do you really think what you’vebstated holds up in the face of x, y, and z?” And I personally dislike that form because if someone takes issue with something I assert, that person should take responsibility for their position. And not hide behind the question. If, say, you think some comments are valueless, say so plainly. And we can talk about that. Don’t pose the question, then argue with the responders. IMO. Cheers!

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #62

#68
Martina, I am intrigued by your question, "Is it really interesting to see dozens of comments that aren't dialogues?" You got me thinking. I wonder whether receiving so many comments and answering them without achieving further and continuing dialogue with commenters is blogging without purpose? The continuing dialogue with an engaging audience is something we can see in posts by Ali \ud83d\udc1d Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee. I still have so much to learn from those people who have mastered the art of dialogue.

John Rylance

John Rylance

3 years ago #61

If do discover what it is let us all know the secret.#76

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #60

#74
Yes John it crossed my mind that a lot of responses means I must be doing something right. I only need to discover what it is. :-))

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #59

#71
Simply said and true. Thanks, Jim.

John Rylance

John Rylance

3 years ago #58

#73
Lada, perhaps one solution when faced with lots of comments and feedback is to every so often post a coverall saying thank you to everyone who has contributed thus far. This is something which happened a lot on LinkedIn, especially on group sites. Also it can provide a chance to draw together strands or summarise what has been said. I realise this is something you have done and can and does open up and extend exchanges of views as it has done here. Hold on to the fact that since you are getting a lot of responses you must be doing something right. Look at all the posts that struggle to generate two or three or for that matter any responses.

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #57

#66
Yes, I think this subject is worth discussing because to give feedback, not only on posts but also on comments, is the essential part of blogging. It is like giving feedback on feedback. Thank you, my friend, for joining the conversation.

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #56

#70
Thanks Randall. I shared this post on Linkedin too, and all commenters agreed that every comment doesn't merit a reply. One of them said that acknowledging comments by a 'Like' should be enough and responding is only for comments that extend the conversation or represent an alternative viewpoint. Different people, different opinions. Every comment in this thread to which I responded merit a reply, not just because I feel obligated to respond but because everyone expressed their opinion regarding the post topic and different answers to the questions I asked that prompted me to reply.

Randall Burns

Randall Burns

3 years ago #55

Great post Lada \ud83c\udfe1 Prkic and I've pondered these same questions myself. I do believe in the philosophy of write for yourself and don't expect any feedback although I do appreciate and generally acknowledge any feedback that I do get. Generally comments are initiating a dialogue which is a 2-way street and I will interact if I'm engaged with the topic, but as with you I am guided my intuition. Regarding your question of, "When intentions behind comment are not good, should such comment be dignified with a reply?", I ignore them, too busy with better things to do than to engage in what I perceive as "negative" or "trolling". As Ian Weinberg states, which I agree with , "Also important is gratitude and value contribution - making something better than before you engaged with it.".

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #54

#63
Preston, you said that commenting helped you to meet great clients. It reminds me of Deb Helfrich and how commenting has worked for her too. Many others built personal and professional relationships based on blog comments and then extending the conversation beyond the comments. So you never know where the opportunity lies and who might be reading your comments and responses.

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #53

#60
Great lesson about interaction on social media, Martina. I apologize if I offended you unintentionally.

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

3 years ago #52

#59
Lada, I can only answer for myself on the reasos for “migrating” from LI to beBee. I came as a writer who was tired of having my access to my self-elected followers limited arbitrarily by LinkedIn because it wanted to eliminate competition to its annointed “Influencers”. Javier \ud83d\udc1d beBee promised in print to distribute 100% of my articles to 100%!of my followers 100% of the time. And ther was an expectation raised that there would be on beBee’s publishing sub-platform equal treatment for all writers and there would not be any arbitrary tiers such as designated “Influencers”. BeBee has pretty mich kept the first of those two promises. Whic is commendable and is what keeps me here. For the record, regarding the second, beBee’s performance sseems to me to be lacking, as a tier of favored members was created in the form of the beBee Brand Ambassadors. The Ambassadors are, in my view, contingently compensated affiliate marketers. But that is not what concerns me. What concerns me is that they are given special promotion via the beBee Embassy (I thiink it is called), in effect creating a corps of appointed “Influencers”. While the critera for such appointment appears inconsistent and amorphous. I sm not sure this comment is rxactly germane, but I thought we should keep the history straight. Cheers!

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #51

#61
I didn't know that, dear Ali. Hope you are feeling better now. If good wishes could heal, you would immediately become healthy. :) Your comment beautifully summed up what I want to say with the post. "If we have time to write we should have the time also to respond. If we don't have it then we should make it." I would only add what I said to Manjit that by responding to comment we express our appreciation and respect to a person behind the words, something we often forget.

Bill Stankiewicz, 🐝 Brand Ambassador

I make an attempt to always try to call or respond to requests I receive via email, phone call, or in meetings. At times if I cannot help I do say know but do provide other contacts that may be in a better position to help.'

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

Thank you Lada \ud83c\udfe1 Prkic for bringing this buzz to my attention. I am sorry to be late to the discussions, but I haven't been feeling well over the last two days. I haven't even had the strength to respond to all comments on my last buzz. Yes, I do write now for the joy I get from writing. If I write without joy then I shall fail to make the reader joyful. For every action there is a reaction. This is the natural law. If somebody cares enough to comment then I should care enough to respond. I learn from comments and they fuel new ideas as a bonus. I strongly recommend that we all should respond to comments. If we have time to write we should have the time also to respond. If we don't have it then we should make it.

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #48

#49
My thought also, Debesh. John Rylance have opened the topic on lack of responding to comments on Influencers' posts on Linkedin that was one of the reasons, among many other; that many people gravitated to beBee.

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

3 years ago #47

#52
Lada \ud83c\udfe1 Prkic, your kinder interpretation is understandable and might be correct ... if there wasn’t a history of aggressive remarks on other posts that I’ve chosen for the most pat to ignore. I believe that if one is asking for additional factual information in good faith, it is incumbent upon the “asker” to first run a simple Google search because very often the information is available with a few keystrokes. So why burden the author if one is not asking for an opinion? Cheers!

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

3 years ago #46

#51
You are spot on about the lack of interaction from arbitrarily designated “Influencers” on LinkedIn. A number of causes factor in. A great many employ ghost writers. A decent ghost writer can adopt a voice that fits with the client Influencer’s “brand.” But it’s much harder (and more expensive) to pay a ghost to deal with questions and exchanges because the conversation cannot be fully controlled. And I suspeect that a high oroportion of Influencers are too vapid to do that themselves, even if willing to take time away from activities that more directly generate revenue. Cheers!

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

3 years ago #45

#50
Debesh Choudhury, i am anal compulsive about not having too many or confusing typos in a comment. Since there is no edit functtion available, this is what I do: Bloch and copy the original comment to the clipboard. Open a new comment box. Paste the original comment into the new box. Correct and post. Then remove original comment. Takes only a few seconds longer than using an edit button. Cheers, my friend.

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #44

#44
I have nothing to add, but I would like to thank you for commenting. :-)

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #43

#40
Brian, I agree that your writings are not fit for mass consumption. :) But it's OK to me. You have found your niche and enjoy being controversial and defending your arguments in replies to comments.

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #42

#34
Phil, yes I noticed that person while reading your comment threads. But perhaps, and forgive me for my naivety, the person just wants some kind of interaction by asking questions or is frustrated and angry, not on you, but on what you are presenting.

John Rylance

John Rylance

3 years ago #41

Two words sum up the difference between those who respond to comments and those who don't Ownership and Accountability. A great deal of the posts made by Influencers were written by someone other than the by liner. Secondly they did not feel that had to respond to those who challenged the pontifications. Unlike the majority of those like yourself who welcome comments enjoy the debate and inter-change of ideas. Personally I don't mind my comments not being acknowledged as long as I see that comments etc. are being made. #46

Debesh Choudhury

Debesh Choudhury

3 years ago #40

There is no EDIT button on beBee yet (shame) for correcting the comments! I made some missed "o"s in some words!

Debesh Choudhury

Debesh Choudhury

3 years ago #39

A very important pint abut blogging - the comments and the reply. I strongly feel that the author should reply to all comments, if the comments are just "Good one" "Awesome", the author should "like" them (fortunately there is not "dislike" button. If the author becomes very popular, and get thousands of "like"s and hundreds of comments, I don't know how it can be handled. But, I think it is an obligation of the author to respond to all the comments.

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #38

#38
I agree, Nicole. That's what I mentioned in the post. Putting effort and thought into comments, and being ignored, it can be somewhat disappointing. No ill feelings, just another life lesson. :)

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #37

#36
Dear Paul Walters, thank you! Your comment merit a reply. :-) Sometimes a few words in response to a comment make a reader's day.

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #36

#28
John, I am on Linkedin too, and I never commented on any of Influencer's post, not just because of what you said, but because I couldn't relate to most of their topics, unlike the posts by Unfluencers. Thank you for joining the conversation. I don't expect all writers to agree with me about replying to every comment. I feel appreciated when an author responds to my comment, and I think that most commenters feel the same way. :)

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #35

#27
Hi Pamela. I never comment on my phone because it's difficult to type without errors. I use it for reading, sharing, and giving "relevants". The phone is the main reason that many people give one-word comments. I'm glad to see that I'm not the only one who fears Susan. 😂😂

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #34

#17
Dear Franci, I agree with your comment. I can only add that I am not fond of one-word comments, and I said it many times. On this matter, I more appreciate receiving the "relevant" to the post. But we are all different, and I accept it.

Gert Scholtz

Gert Scholtz

3 years ago #33

Lada \ud83c\udfe1 Prkic There have been so many excellent contributions in this thread. My two cents: I think it is basic good manners to reply to each bona fide comment. A reply enriches my post experience and interaction – and maybe that of the recipient as well. If my time is restricted, I at least acknowledge a comment by way of a like. If others don’t respond to my comment, then what I say may not warrant a response, their time may be limited, they may have missed the notification, or they don’t feel like responding – which is all fine with me. Thank you for a good discussion post Lada, and by the way, there is really no need to reply my comment.

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #32

#30
Ian, thank you for commenting on almost every my post. I'm glad that you think of them as relevant and worth commenting. For me, your comments and responses are always food for thought, or in Manjit's words, very nutritive. My comments, on the contrary, are more low-calorie. 😂 Thank you for enriching this conversation.

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #31

#37
Manjit, I'm so glad that your hands are better and you are able to write again. When it comes to responding to comments and interaction in general, you reminded us of one important ingredient, and this is LOVE for people as Ali Annani shows us continuously. Responding to every comment is actually showing respect and love to a person behind those words, what we often forget.

CityVP Manjit

CityVP Manjit

3 years ago #30

If you see comments as nutritious then you will dine with them and the way Ali \ud83d\udc1d Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee pulls nutrition from a comment is authentic to who he is - and I term this "love for people". I am actually going to respond to Ali Anani with a post of the same name this week to further elaborate on what was initially an offline conversation between him and me. At Susan \ud83d\udc1d Rooks, the Grammar Goddess has brand presence and so that also serves a specific relationship, in her case, she provides a specialty area and is a leading representative of this area and the term "Grammar Goddess" is a part of that relationship. When it comes to hostile responses, they represent the opinions of the person giving them and here it depends on our own sensitivities and values. There are people who naturally want to probe but for me, my first thought is whether the negative comment has narcissistic qualities - to the point of trying to evoke some kind of response, without any desire to add value. The difference between constructive dialogue and destructive dialogue comes with both learned and felt-experience. At the end of the day comments are based on context for me and my context is different and what is appropriate for me. For me one size does not fit all.

Paul Walters

Paul Walters

3 years ago #29

Lada \ud83c\udfe1 Prkic . If its worth a reply then simply do it or, if not the relevant button does the trick. Your pieces however ALWAYS warrants a reply.

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

3 years ago #28

#29
You will forgive me if I multiply the number of comments to which you may feel an obligation to respond. But because I generally expend a significant amount of time and effort answering the comments on my posts, you've raised a question that very much interests me. We've talked about short comments of the "great post" variety, and we've spoken of longer, quite substantive comments. Ian has mentioned troll-like and other outright hostile comments. But there is another type that is rarer, but which I've run across recently on a couple of my posts, for example, on my latest "Artificial Un-Intelligence" (https://www.bebee.com/producer/@friedman-phil/artificial-un-intelligence). That is, an essentially hostile comment cloaked as an innocent question or request for additional supporting information. The hostility consists of the questioner's expectation that you have misstated something and cannot, therefore, answer the question or supply the information. The rub is that you can, but such is not necessary because the information is available to anyone who bothers to do a simple and quick Google search. The commenter doesn't know this because he or she is lazy and isn't really interested in the answer, except insofar as he or she expects the question to embarrass you. This is a new mutation of trollism that wastes an author's time because, unlike a blatant attack statement, a seemingly innocent question needs to be answered.lest the author be made to appear unfriendly. I hope that the majority of the community will begin to recognize this new form of trolling for what it is. Cheers!

Mohammed Abdul Jawad

Mohammed Abdul Jawad

3 years ago #27

#18
Lada \ud83c\udfe1 Prkic Let's be thankful to those who sum up words to make meaningful comments. Perhaps, those who practice simplicity take delight with their brevity of expressions.

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #26

#19
It's good to see you, Kevin. I like your posts as well as your comments such as this one. Many times I've seen comment thread that is more interesting than a post itself. I always "envy" those writers whose responses to comments and ability to conduct a long and intellectual conversation makes the thread so interesting and attracting to new commenters. Unfortunately, we can't all be Friedman, Annani, Pashuk.. .. :)

Ian Weinberg

Ian Weinberg

3 years ago #25

Greetings Lada \ud83c\udfe1 Prkic I'm coming in at the tail-end of this dialogue. Don't feel obliged to respond to this - I know that it must be getting a little tedious at this stage. My thoughts: I only comment on posts which I feel are relevant and where my response is a value contribution to the subject and to the dialogue. I don't respond to disparaging, troll-like comments unless I'm in the mood to do some sparring (but I've grown out of this). I make a point of responding to all other comments out of respect for the individual that's taken the trouble to contribute. I also derive significant value from engaging with writers of substance - similar to writing the post, the need to get thoughts aligned in the comment enhances my understanding of the concepts. I'm generally not put out if no response is received to any of my own comments. Thanks for initiating this conversation.

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #24

#16
Phil, I really mean what I have written about you, and your determination to reply to every comment. I'm already exhausting writing replies to these comments. I can't even imagine responding to hundreds of them and always having something new and thoughtful (and a bit provocative) to say. I share your point of view that every comment made in good faith deserves a reply or at least an acknowledgement. Such approach encourages engagement that is more than evident in the comment threads on your posts. And intellectual (more or less) exchange of thoughts and ideas is what it's all about on social media.

John Rylance

John Rylance

3 years ago #23

One of the recurring talking points on LinkedIn was that Influencers never responded to comments. In one way it wasn't surprising since there were often 100s of comments. What annoyed people most was the lack of response to requests to justify their often contentious posts. The lack of response or exchange of views was one of the reasons many gravitated to beBee. To answer the question no it isn't necessary to answer every comment, but it is to reply to some, particularly those that add to the points made, and more so those that may challenge premises raised.

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #22

#14
Thomas, I like your comment. You said that responding to comments should be about information content not just socializing in print. Can it be both? We are socializing through conversation, and I see commenting and responding to comments as an informative conversation.

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #21

#23
Dear Susan, your two cents are worth every penny. :-) I am so glad that you share my point of view although you have to deal with commenters on five platforms. I admire your effort.

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #20

#13
Harvey, I said almost the same in my post on the purpose of being on beBee. I am more a consumer of social media than an active participant, in terms of writing. That’s the reason why I’m not posting constantly and don’t compel myself to write just for the sake of writing. Instead, I read a lot and try to comment on the posts with the topics close to my way of thinking. I agree with you that a conversation (commenting) on social media is not for everyone especially when it comes to opposing opinions. Great comment, as always.

Susan 🐝 Rooks, The Grammar Goddess

Lada \ud83c\udfe1 Prkic, I do my best to respond to EVERY comment, no matter what. And I post regularly on four or five platforms, so sometimes it's a chore. But if a reader takes the time to say anything -- anything -- that person deserves to know I saw it and appreciated it. We all want to feel appreciated, and I feel that when someone takes time out of their valuable day to say anything. So, my two cents' worth.

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #18

#11
John, your comments, unfortunately very rare, always make me think and are difficult for replaying. I am aware of your disappointment with social media in general. I am new to blogging and am still excited about all the process from writing to interacting with readers. Though I noticed things that I don't like, there are many more things that make me spend my precious time on social media, particularly beBee. You said that most people believe they have something important to say or share but unfortunately, that's not true. I agree with you to some extent, but this doesn't diminish the fact that indeed there are people who have something important to say or share, on beBee too. I do not live in an illusion that I am one of those people. I am here to engage with my online community, sometimes to discuss and share some thoughts and ideas I find interesting. Glad to hear from you, John. Good luck to you too. Hope to see you in the next thread.

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #17

#10
There are moments when with all my will to reply to comments I just don't know what to write because of the comment itself, in a good or bad sense. I just can't find the right words. Then, hitting the Like button seems the most appropriate solution.

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

3 years ago #16

Lada \ud83c\udfe1 Prkic, I'd like to mention a peripheral consideration, if I may. If you like a post or find it of value, but don't have the inclination to post a comment other than a simple "Good post" or similar, at least be sure to mark the post "relevant" for that takes only a click and boosts the visibility of the piece on the feed. It also has an effect on whether beBee will promote the post on Twitter and elsewhere. Thanks. Cheers!

Kevin Pashuk

Kevin Pashuk

3 years ago #15

Great topic Lada! Comment streams can be an intriguing continuation of the core ideas of the post, or they can be clutter... (You can tell I'm a raging introvert allergic to small talk... "Nice post!", "Thanks", "You are welcome"... add nothing to the conversation. I do feel that those type of comments can be replaced with a 'Relevant' (if the stats were working correctly and actually inform you of who liked your comment or marked your post relevant - the names disappear when there are multiple likes)). (Note the embedded parenthesis... Sorry for the bad sentence structure Susan \ud83d\udc1d Rooks, the Grammar Goddess. Back to the first type of comment... those that add to the conversation. IMO, they are typically better than the post (especially with my posts). That conversation is the essence of why I get involved in Social Media, and why I will always try to respond.

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #14

#8
Mohammed, you said it's best we reciprocate to someone's thoughtful comments, with our own feedback and gratitude. The point is what about other comments that are not thoughtful or relevant to the topic but more thank-you-for-the-share kind of comments, or one-word comments. Can one-word sentence ( wow or great) be considered as a comment?

Franci 🐝Eugenia Hoffman, beBee Brand Ambassador

I don't comment on everything I read if I have nothing constructive to add. If I write a post and receive comments, then I feel my acknowledging that comment is being grateful and respectful on my part. One-word comments are difficult to judge because the author doesn't know if the comment is just a drive-through message or a true thought of appreciation. I don't have a problem with one-word comments if I don't see the same commenter using it repetitively. I agree with Paul \.

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

3 years ago #12

Lada \ud83c\udfe1 Prkic, thank you for the call-out. As with most things social, the answer to your question is not simple. Personally, I believe that every comment made in good faith deserves a reply or at least an acknowledgment. Otherwise, the author of the post is saying that his or her thoughts warrant attention but that those of the readers do not. So I try to answer all comments except those which are clearly abusive or ill-intended. Some comments are more complicated and longer than the post itself. In such cases, I try to pick a key point to respond to. However, I take the most satisfaction when something I've published touches off an extended and animated dialogue between a reader and myself, or between a group of readers. For me, intellectual exchange and engagement are what it's all about. And yes, driving engagement requires enormous amounts of time and effort. Good question here. Cheers!

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #11

#9
Thank you Debasish. Your comment is one of those generic comments I mentioned in the post that are difficult to find the reason to respond. Nevertheless, I appreciate it.

Harvey Lloyd

Harvey Lloyd

3 years ago #10

I am more observer than poster on social media. I have observed some of the same trends you stated in your post. With each comment io make or post i read you begin to understand who is looking for conversation, who is just throwing their name out and many other agendas. In honesty i would have to admit when i first weighed in on social media i treated it as a conversation i would have with anyone in person. I really got schooled that its really not a conversation for everyone. In posting we all have an agenda. Mine is observation and exploration of ideals that are different. Like a new social group you have to wade in slowly and figure out each person and if the comments or likes are appreciated or not. I am with you though. If i do post and someone takes time to comment i am appreciative and respond. Even if i don't like their comment. They took the time from all the other noise and read my post and commented. It is a dilemma with rules i guess that are different than physical social settings. Great conversation.

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #9

#5
Perhaps you are, but I'm not fine if I don't reply to your comment. :)

John Prpich

John Prpich

3 years ago #8

I remember when I used to be excited about blogging, I made an effort to talk about issues that I didn't feel were being addressed hoping for a conversation, I was interested in what others were thinking. I stopped blogging because I've come to realize that most people are thinking the same thing, right or wrong and that killed my interest. There's so much white noise out in the world that social electronic conversation has become of very little interest. People are close-minded and really not interested in changing their perspectives. Most comments are repeated over and over again, which tells you that people won't even take the time to read what others have written, so they repeat themselves. I call it drive by social conversation, here's what I think, thanks, have a good day. Most people believe they have something important to say or share, unfortunately, that's not true. Thanks, Lada, Good Luck.

Debasish Majumder

Debasish Majumder

3 years ago #7

nice insight Lada \ud83c\udfe1 Prkic! enjoyed read and shared. thank you for the share.

Mohammed Abdul Jawad

Mohammed Abdul Jawad

3 years ago #6

Simple courtesies matter! It's best we reciprocate to someone's thoughtful comments, with our own feedback and gratitude. And then, how we respond depends on the way we perceive others' writings. If we fail to counsel or comment on others' work, then it's best to learn from others' flow of writing. After all, good, inspiring posts enhances and refreshes one's knowledge.

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #5

#3
Me too, Pascal. Responding is a very demanding if you want to write more than just a thank-you-for- commenting reply. It's even more demanding when you want to write responses to comments written by some great thinkers on beBee. I have a feeling that my little grey cells are going to explode trying to write an equal insightful reply. :)

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #4

#2
Thanks for the feedback., Ana-Maria. Great to know that you think the same way about responding to comments. Do you care when a writer of the post doesn't reply to your comment?

Zacharias 🐝 Voulgaris

Zacharias 🐝 Voulgaris

3 years ago #3

It depends on the comment. Some of the comments are there just to express gratitude to the author, or include someone else in the loop so that they can read the buzz also. Other comments are more interactive, offering different perspectives and perhaps even questioning the assumptions of the author. The latter tend to require more attention, perhaps even a reply. Whatever the case, I'm fine if you don't reply to any of my comments :-)

Lada 🏡 Prkic

Lada 🏡 Prkic

3 years ago #2

#1
Fair indeed. :)

Pascal Derrien

Pascal Derrien

3 years ago #1

While I don't always leave a comment on what I read (mainly because I have nothing to say), I always reply to those who take the time to drop a line on my posts, now sometimes (most of the time actually :-)) my answers don't match the insightful and smart comments or pointers but at least I acknowledge them. In the end I find answering to comments pretty hard

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