Lada 🏑 Prkic

4 years ago Β· 1 min. reading time Β· visibility 0 Β·

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Quick Buzz Becoming the Producer Post β–Ί Concrete from Wood!

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According to the new changes on the beBee platform, a short buzz or a Quick Buzz, as named, will be distributed only to followers and won’t be shared in any hive.

If you want to share a link or a picture into a specific hive, you need to write the additional text to fulfil the minimum quota foreseen for a Producer post (200 words).

It is my first attempt at converting a Quick Buzz into a Producer post and sharing the linkΒ to my hive Interesting Engineering, Technology, and Discoveries.

The article is about a new type of concrete largely consists of wood developed by Swiss researchers of the Institute for Building and Environmental Technologies at the School of Engineering and Architecture of Fribourg. They are fabricating a load-bearing concrete in which the volume fraction of the wood is over 50 percent.

Quick Buzz Becoming the Producer Post β–Ί Concrete from Wood!


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According to the head of the Institute Daia Zwicky, the new concrete-wood materials weight half the weight of normal concrete. The lightest of them even float!Β  They also show good flame retardancy and act as thermal insulation.

It will take several years before we see the first buildings in which lightweight concrete containing wood plays an integral role in the construction. The level of knowledge required for widespread application is still too limited.
Daia Zwicky

More about this exciting discovery Β on,Β https://phys.org/news/2017-07-concrete-wood.html

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Comments
Jerry Fletcher

Jerry Fletcher

2 years ago #38

#48
And so it goes. (Nice of y'all to notice.) So what is this Quick Buzz and where do I learn about it?

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

#47
May be I was influenced by Jerry Fletcher without realizing it.

Lada 🏑 Prkic

Lada 🏑 Prkic

2 years ago #36

#46
I almost thought that comment was written by Jerry Fletcher because of "So it goes." :)

Ali 🐝 Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee

Advancements take time to disseminate in the minds of practitioners dear Lada. So it goes.

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #34

#42
Ah, Lada, now I understand even better. The WCC is not a significant structural contributor, but essential a surfacing layer and fire-spread resistant barrier. The high admisture of wood sawdust not only lightens the material but probably helps to minimize differential in coefficients of thermal expansion re the GLULAM and surfacing later. BTW, my share of your buzz on LinkedIn has already racked up nearly 1,400 views and significant engagement. Not bad at all in comparison to the reaction here -- especially when you factor in, what I call, the Reality Conversion Coefficient. Cheers!

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #33

#42
Ah, Lada, now I understand even better. The WCC is not a significant structural contributor, but essential a surfacing layer and fire-spread resistant barrier. The high admisture of wood sawdust not only lightens the material but probably helps to minimize differential in coefficients of thermal expansion re the GLULAM and surfacing later. BTW, my share of your buzz on LinkedIn has already racked up Neal you 1,400 views and significant engagement. Not bad at all in comparison to the reaction here -- especially when you factor in, what I call, the Reality Conversion Coefficient. Cheers!

Lada 🏑 Prkic

Lada 🏑 Prkic

4 years ago #32

#28
Sorry for the late response. I'm in the process of relocation. My office is moving to a different location in the city, and there is a lot of work to do. Phil, all such research activities are focused on the ecological aspects and finding alternatives to concrete. This method significantly reduces the quantity of concrete. The image in the post shows the testing process of the specimen consisting of glulam beams on the bottom and the WCC layer over. Also, very interesting is how two different materials are connected together to ensure distribution of loads but also a solid connection between WCC and timber. Placing WCC as the secondary (non-structural) layer met all requirements for fire resistance, acoustic and thermal insulation. As for the lack of the interest, I have nothing more to say. If I had a time, I'd share this myself with my community on LI. Thanks for doing so.

Lada 🏑 Prkic

Lada 🏑 Prkic

4 years ago #31

#28
Sorry for the late response. I'm in the process of relocation. My office is moving to a different location in the city, and there is a lot of work to do. Phil, all such research activities are focused on the ecological aspects and finding alternatives to concrete. This method significantly reduces the quantity of concrete. The image in the post shows the testing process of the specimen consisting of glulam beams on the bottom and the WCC layer over. Also, very interesting is how two different materials are connected together to ensure distribution of loads but also to prevent slip between WCC and timber. Placing WCC as the secondary (non-structural) layer met all requirements for fire resistance, acoustic and thermal insulation. As for the lack of the interest, I have nothing more to say. If I had a time, I'd share this myself with my community on LI. Thanks for doing so.

Javier 🐝 CR

Javier 🐝 CR

4 years ago #30

#39
Kevin Baker well said! Hives are for producing honey!

Javier 🐝 CR

Javier 🐝 CR

4 years ago #29

#18
Lada \ud83c\udfe1 Prkicpr this will last because it is indexed by Google :)

Nick Mlatchkov

Nick Mlatchkov

4 years ago #28

#14
And dead silence on my points from the Admins of beBee ...

Lada 🏑 Prkic

Lada 🏑 Prkic

4 years ago #27

#33
Although a timber floor slab is claimed to provide a better feel underfoot than concrete floor slab, I never felt the difference on my joints. I've been living whole my life in houses with reinforced concrete slabs and wood floors over. For six years now, I've been working in a 100-years old building with timber floor slabs and what I sometimes feel are vibrations. To prevent stress on joints, perhaps you can install sleepers subfloor over a concrete slab.

Franci 🐝Eugenia Hoffman, beBee Brand Ambassador

Lada \ud83c\udfe1 Prkic - πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘β­οΈβ­οΈβ­οΈβ­οΈβ­οΈ

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #25

#32
Joanne, to answer your questions -- 1) epoxy polymers generally do better than polyesters re flammability, smoke generation, and toxic gasses. You are correct, however, that reaction to fire is of concern where polymers (plastics) are involved. Significant improvements can be made by adding inorganic materials to the resins, and in this regard, epoxies are much more tolerant of such additions as to potential modifications of their mechanical properties, which are in general much higher (by 10x on average) than those of polyesters. 2) If a slab floor is to be a "work floor" with people walking constantly upon it, the best way to deal with that is, in my experience, to add a resilient "top floor" over the slab. That can be as simple as rubber or vinyl matting or as sophisticated as a floating "gymnasium" style over-floor. Eh, Lada \ud83c\udfe1 Prkic?

David B. Grinberg

David B. Grinberg

4 years ago #24

Lada, you provide an excellent example of leveraging the improvements to this platform to share buzz in hives via Producer. Kudos on your efforts and buzz on!

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #23

PS- Lada \ud83c\udfe1 Prkic, I do believe that the described WCC would be a great material for casting the blocks for the ubiquitous (to NorthAmerica) concrete block building construction. If lightweight blocks could be cast in WCC with self-aligning and self-locking tabs (like giant Legos), the reduced weight might make shipping from centralized manufacturing plants cost-feasible. Resulting in faster, higher-quality assembly on-site by lower-cost, lesser skilled labor. I like that idea a lot, especially in the area of affordable housing. Cheers!

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #22

#23
Lada \ud83c\udfe1 Prkic, I've now looked at the additional articles listed at the end of the news piece and one of the things I see is that WCC is being used in composite members with engineered wood (GLULAM) in slab applications, for example as the structural floor slabs in a multi-storied warehouse. In such a case the GLULAM component is used on the bottom where flexure loading (beam bending) puts the GLULAM in tension, while the upper WCC component is placed in compression. This makes sense to me, as it takes the best advantage of the mechanical properties of the materials involved, including the better abrasion and fire resistance of the WCC vs wood. However, I still wonder why WCC instead of traditional reinforced concrete? Does the reduced structural weight allow a higher live-load bearing for the slab? Even though the upper WCC component will have a lower compressive strength vs reinforced concrete? Or could it be that the WCC component is a better match with the GLULAM component in terms of coefficient of thermal expansion? Finally, I continue to wonder if a better approach might not be a completely engineered wood member, surfaced with abrasion and fire resistant aggregates held in an epoxy polymer-based matrix? The issues and questions are quite fascinating and I don't understand why so little interest is shown on beBee by the engineering community which appears to be large. I am going to share this to LinkedIn where I know from experience there are engineers who would love to kick around these questions and the research you point to. Cheers!

Lada 🏑 Prkic

Lada 🏑 Prkic

4 years ago #21

#25
I forgot to thank you for commenting both the Quick Buzz information and the main subject of the buzz, new wood concrete material. :-) Some other research on concrete wood are conducted in Canada.

Lada 🏑 Prkic

Lada 🏑 Prkic

4 years ago #20

Thanks for commenting, Joanne. I'm curious to see its large-scale application.

Lada 🏑 Prkic

Lada 🏑 Prkic

4 years ago #19

#12
Thanks, Chas. I don't post often, but with the new rule, I think I'll post less because it takes time to write even such small post. But when you are in Rome...... :-) By the way, why the new profile photo? Is this some form of protest? :-)

Lada 🏑 Prkic

Lada 🏑 Prkic

4 years ago #18

#19
#20 Phil, something happened with my mobile and I accidentally deleted my reply to you. I write it again. Phil, you and I both are the builders. You build ships and I build buildings. So, you are more than qualified to ask questions. :-) Heavy materials like reinforced concrete require higher installation and transportation costs than lighter construction materials. As for this new type of concrete, I've read the paper mentioned at the end of the article explaining the use of wood-cement compounds (WCC) in structural elements. Combining WCC with timber for load-bearing systems creates a HYBRID structure that is strong as a structural element, merging advantages of each material (fire resistance, thermal and acoustic insulation). Because of low stiffness of WCC, the material is placed in the compressive layer of a hybrid slab to increase the stiffness of the load-bearing element. As said in the article, the level of existing knowledge required for widespread application is still too limited. It will take several years before implementation. You're right this is an improve concrete, but I see it as a large improvement towards "greener" building materials. I'm sure we'll see many more improvements in the years to come. Thank you for commenting on the subject of the post. It seems you'll be the only one. 😞

Lada 🏑 Prkic

Lada 🏑 Prkic

4 years ago #17

#12
Thanks, Chass. I don't post often, but with the new rule, I think I'll post less because it takes time to write even such small post. But when you are in Rome...... :-) By the way, why the new profile photo? Is this some form of protest? :-)

Lada 🏑 Prkic

Lada 🏑 Prkic

4 years ago #16

#19
#20 Phil, you and I both are the builders. You build ships and I build buildings. So, you are more than qualified to ask questions. :-) Heavy materials like reinforced concrete require higher installation and transportation costs than lighter construction materials. As for this new type of concrete, I've read the paper mentioned at the end of the article explaining the use of wood-cement compounds (WCC) in structural elements. Combining WCC with timber for load-bearing systems creates a HYBRID structure (TWCC) that is strong as a structural element, merging advantages of each material (fire resistance, thermal and acoustic insulation). Because of low stiffness of WCC, the material is placed in the compressive layer of a hybrid slab to increase the stiffness of the load-bearing element. As said in the article, the existing level of knowledge required for widespread application of this hybrid material is still too limited. It will take several years before implementation. You're right this is an improve concrete, but I see it as a large improvement towards "greener" building materials. I'm sure we'll see many more improvements in the years to come. Thank you for commenting on the subject of the post. It seems you'll be the only one. :-)

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #15

Okay,Lada \ud83c\udfe1 Prkicl -- but I see this product as an engineering solution in search of a problem, and not a very good solution at that. 1) The weight of structural members is not generally a concern in stationary structures, certainly not to the extent that it is a concern in the engineering of self-propelled mobile structures such as ships and yachts. In other words, we don't generally care what a bridge weighs, as long as it carries the loads and doesn't fall down. So why seek to reduce the weight of concrete members at what will have to be a sacrifice in compressive strength? (cont Pt. II)

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #14

Lada \ud83c\udfe1 Prkic - Pt. II 2) I note that the article refers to the use of wood "sawdust" in replacement of stone or I'd guess sand aggregate. If accurate, there will not be any gains in terms of tensile or flexural strength. Where I am based in South Florida, driveway and parking lot pavers have been using pre-molded stones made of Portland cement concrete admixed with glass fiber aggregate (chopped strand fiberglass). The paver stones are said to exhibit a major increase in tensile and bending strength, as well as being lighter and easier to handle and place. The key here is those strong fibres set into the cement matrix add strength, as might wood fibers. But wood particles, even chips won't. 3) The move to "improve" concrete might be self-defeating on a global basis. I recently read about research that shows the carbon footprint contributed by plants which manufacture Portland cement is huge and among the worst worldwide. So my contention is that we'd be much better off learning to return to more wooden structures (albeit it using modern engineering and techniques adapted from the science of strong materials). Interesting and thought-provoking post. Thanks and cheers!

Lada 🏑 Prkic

Lada 🏑 Prkic

4 years ago #13

#11
Dear Phil, you don't need to wait to see how many people will be interested in talking about the engineering aspects of the wood-concrete materials. The answer is probably, none (I still hope I'm wrong). I realized that fact as soon as I came to beBee, despite the apparently large number of users coming from the construction industry. Final confirmation of this "thesis" is my last Producer, Engineering Talks No. 1. Even people I mentioned in the post, who are the authors of some articles about construction-related topics, never joined the discussion here on beBee but reached to me on LinkedIn. I think it's the same situation with the Milos Djukic's posts on material science topics. The same is with you when you publish articles about the marine industry. But as in life I hardly give up. I still hope that at least one person close to my profession read this. :-) Hope dies last.

Javier 🐝 CR

Javier 🐝 CR

4 years ago #12

#16
Moi Kliniger will get more visibility now on than before!

Javier 🐝 CR

Javier 🐝 CR

4 years ago #11

#13
Kevin Baker thank you. In fact, this change already raised the quality ! Buzz on! 🐝🐝🐝🐝

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #10

Lada, before programs that actually counted words, in publishing, we used to assume that the average character count for a "word" was five. If I work on this older standard assumption, your word count on this piece comes to about 336 -- or 168% of the prescribed minimum (which BTW is not new, but only now being enforced). Personally, I agree with @Javier 🐝 beBee that "naked links" (no attached commentary) have no place in the Producer stream, and to my mind allowing them to be posted as Quick Buzzes to one's followers makes the most sense. PS - I will post shortly an engineering question related to this product and will look forward to your always erudite answer. It will then be interesting to see if anyone else is interested in talking about the engineering aspects of this -- as opposed to the peripheral issue of beBeeposting rules. Cheers!

Phil Friedman

Phil Friedman

4 years ago #9

Lada, before programs that actually counted words, in publishing, we used to assume that the Vera he character count for a "word" was five. If I work on this older standard assumption, your word count on this piece comes to about 336 -- or 168% of the prescribed minimum (which BTW is not new, but only now being enforced). Personally, I agree with Javier \ud83d\udc1d beBee that "naked links" (no attached commentary) have no place in the Producer stream, and to my mind allowing them to be posted as Quick Buzzes to one's followers makes the most sense. PS - I will post shortly an engineering question related to this product and will look forward to your always erudite answer. It will then be interesting to see if anyone else is interested in talking about the engineering aspects of this -- as opposed to the peripheral issue of beBeeposting rules. Cheers!

Lada 🏑 Prkic

Lada 🏑 Prkic

4 years ago #8

#4
Glad to see you, Linda. This post is the first one of the so-called "converted" articles since the short form contents (short buzzes) can't be distributed to the hives anymore. For example, your buzz about the lecterns and trade show stands now will be distributed only to your followers. Thanks for commenting. Have a good weekend too.

Lada 🏑 Prkic

Lada 🏑 Prkic

4 years ago #7

#2
#3 Thank you for the clapping hands and sharing. :-) I'll give this new form of content a try. It requires much more time than before to share articles in the specific hives. But since it is a new rule we must accept that to maintain existing groups. To build the construction community around industry-oriented hives is already a hard job on beBee. Hope this will work. :-)

Javier 🐝 CR

Javier 🐝 CR

4 years ago #6

#4
Linda Adams exactlym Thanks for your support. It makes sense not to put a buzz in any hives and encourages elaborated content!

Nick Mlatchkov

Nick Mlatchkov

4 years ago #5

I suspect this lousy new rule is aimed at producers who can say important things using much less words than others. If u want to publish articles start a newspaper a la the Huff Post and pay the contributors ...

Javier 🐝 CR

Javier 🐝 CR

4 years ago #4

Two great advantages: a notification to your followers and an email to your followers ;)

Javier 🐝 CR

Javier 🐝 CR

4 years ago #3

You need to work a little bit but.. it is beautiful. You added value to the hive! When we share a link we tend not to add any value and that link is everywhere. Thanks

Javier 🐝 CR

Javier 🐝 CR

4 years ago #2

πŸ€—πŸ€—πŸ€—πŸ€—πŸ€—πŸ€—πŸ€—πŸ€—πŸ€—

Javier 🐝 CR

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